You Lucky People!!!

Such a steal! Such a deal!!

Andrew Joyce

For the next three days my magnum opus Mahoney is on sale for a mere 99 cents. What a deal!!!

Please don’t all of you rush over to Amazon to buy it all at once. The line forms on the right.

Now, if ya’all will excuse me, I gotta go and read my reviews again (all great!) for the 10,000th time.

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This entry was posted on September 27, 2019. 1 Comment

Life Giver

My followers, few but all cool cats, will enjoy this. (Geez … no concoction my human puts in MY bowl ever gives me such an experience…)

Andrew Joyce

sandpainting

We are here to create … I do it with words … but we all create … if nothing else, we create our lives each and every day as soon as we get out of bed.

I once had a mystical experience when I was quite young and on the road.

That experience forms my writing … it forms me … I spoke with God … once upon a time …

I swear this is all true. This is an abbreviated version of what happened on that magical, mystical night.

I was hitchin’ from LA to Miami. Along about sundown, a blue pickup truck picked me up on Old Highway 90. One thing led to another and the next thing I knew, I was spending the night with a young Apache Indian. His name was Jimmy.

After his grandmother fed me, we walked out into the desert and sat down…

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Writing Tips: Avoid Clichés – by Melissa Donovan…

Excellent piece!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Writing Forward:

There are many writing tips that tell us what to avoid in our work: We should keep adverbs to a minimum. Don’t use verbiage, which is excessive and unnecessary language. Watch out for info dumps. And avoid clichés.

But why should we avoid clichés? What’s a cliché, anyway, and how do we identify them in our writing? What if a cliché is the best way to express something?

Let’s explore these questions and determine whether it’s really necessary to avoid clichés.

Continue reading HERE

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The Two Basic Rules of Editing (and the Rookie Mistake) – by Jane Friedman…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Today’s guest post is excerpted from How to Work With a Writer by editor Allegra Huston

__________

Many people who find themselves in an editorial role make the same mistake. They think they’re supposed to fix the book. They’ve identified the problems and they expend a lot of mental energy on coming up with solutions.

The classic version of this is the film development executive who tells you to put in a car chase (yes, it’s happened to me).

The story is sagging, the pace is dragging: you need some excitement! In this case, the car chase solution is like a sugar hit: a rush followed by dissatisfaction.

Far better to address the underlying story issues—but it’s hard to do that if a car chase, or some other plastered-on idea, is occupying the center of the discussion.

Continue reading HERE

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