Archive | March 2016

Notes from a small dog – 10 tips for training your two-legs

Ani is a very wise canine. Listen up all you in doggie-land, take a lesson from Ani and live a long and happy life, despite your two-legses!!

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

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The correct training of your two-legs… ‘specially visiting two-legses…is critical to their well-being. I thought I’d share my ten favourite tips for the establishment of proper pack behaviour…

ani window1. Use advanced surveillance techniques. Never let them arrive unexpectedly. This gives you a unfair unique advantage. You, of course, will know long before your two-legs that a visitor is arriving. They have to wait for a knock on  the door. Which means, you can be ready… and waiting…

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2. Decontamination. You don’t know where they’ve been… they may even have been near cats! But a thorough washing both cleans them up and lets you investigate. They, poor things, have a problem with soap and smelly stuff… they smear it all over. They taste a lot better when it is all gone. They think you are being cute and giving kisses… but that’s okay. We know better… And anyway, if…

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This entry was posted on March 27, 2016. 2 Comments

Amazing Rain Pictures

What I would find if I looked up the word “wonderful”….so creative. Love them! Thanks to Monsieur Jacrot, and thanks to Chris for the reblog that allowed me to enjoy these!

ALK3R

Christophe Jacrot, also known as Rain Man, is a French photographer who takes awesome pictures of cities caught up in bad weather. He travels around the world, intentionally experiencing different weather conditions, in order to convey some melancholy and romantic charm through his works.

Paris, France

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This entry was posted on March 17, 2016. 5 Comments

Don’t Always Believe What You Read Online

Great advice!!

Writer Site

When I started writing creative nonfiction/memoir, the issue of dialogue tags rose its nasty little head early on. I’d never given them much thought in fiction writing, and they don’t exist in poetry. For some reason, nonfiction made me think and rethink what works best. Maybe it’s that more expressive word choices conveyed more information than plain old “said,” but in nonfiction it seemed like overkill to write “stammered” or “giggled” about oneself.

These “more expressive” tags look something like this:

Eventually I took courses online and learned that all the creative and imaginative tags I’d debated were worthless. I think these teachers were right, so I’m sharing what I learned from them.

The idea is to stay as far from “tagging” as possible.

That means that if you can write dialogue where it’s clear who is speaking each line, you don’t need any tags at all. Sometimes you can start…

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No Music in My House

Wonderful post. Of course I liked the ending the best.
::::Cheshire grin:::

Writer Site

Usually I think I know myself pretty well. But every once in a while I get an epiphany that shows me something I hadn’t quite realized. Maybe the knowledge was somewhere inside my head or even my body, but it hadn’t come to the front of the brain yet. Then, snap, there it is. Today it was about my relationship with music.

I love music. Sometimes I go to symphony concerts, classical and pops. Sometimes I go to old-timer concerts. I love Broadway musicals and have a ton of “soundtrack” CDs. I have an eclectic assortment of music on my iTunes. When I hear country music, I love it. My favorite is bluegrass. And jazz. In the car, I always play music (my daughter’s singing some of the time).

But I rarely play music at home. And I can’t talk country music with people because I’m not familiar enough with…

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